How to increase subwoofer output without upgrading your amp and sub

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Hi everyone!
I received a pretty good question from a reader who wanted to know how he could increase the quality and output from his current amp and sub without upgrading or adding any additional amps or subs. Here’s his current set up: Stock stereo system and line output convertor, an Alpine Type R 12″ in a 1.7 cubic foot ported enclosure with an Alpine PDX-M6. If you’re wondering what you can do to get better output and better bass response with your current amp and sub set up, check out my response:


 

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5 comments for “How to increase subwoofer output without upgrading your amp and sub

  1. Mike
    September 4, 2015 at 9:46 am

    Ok im helping my friend hooking up a system in his Tahoe I think he might be doing too much but here’s my??? He has a hiphonics Zeus 3200 watt mono block super class d amp. & two 15″ alpine type r’s dual 2ohm voice coils and a jlw7-3 12″3ohm svc can he hook all three subs up to that one amp.??? “””SAFELY!!!””” THE salesman THAT sold him the amp told him that the amp was capable of being stable@ 0.5 ohms. I think that’s a tad low but he swears that’s what he was told and the entire reason why he bought the amp. I’ve never messed with a super class d amp b4 so I really don’t know for sure if it would go that low

    • October 3, 2015 at 12:54 pm

      Hey Mike – You should never mix subwoofer models or impedances. The different efficiencies can cause the speakers to play out of phase and can damage the speakers. Just use the two Alpine Type R’s Dual 2 Ohm wired to .5 ohm OR use the W7 wired to 1.5 ohm. For the love of car audio, PLEASE don’t try to mix them all together!

  2. lexiconby
    March 15, 2012 at 1:14 am

    thanks for the info. i’m going to have to build an enclosure for my 12w6 and was originally going to use mdf…never heard of trupan before so thanks for the tip. going to look in to where i can buy it in southern california

  3. lexiconby
    March 12, 2012 at 10:05 am

    Assuming that proper gauge and quality of wire is run, proper ground, assuming that you’re pointing the subs in the right orientation to get the best sound, I would still double check the ported box (i.e. higher quality wood can help a bit). Rather than using MDF or plywood, maybe some solid birch or maple? Just a thought

    • March 12, 2012 at 10:24 pm

      We like trupan. It’s lighter than MDF but just as strong. I think birch or maple would be a disadvantage due to the weight and plywood splinters so that’s not a good option.

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